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Minor in Biological Sciences

Students may obtain an undergraduate minor in biological sciences by taking 15 hours of coursework from the Division of Biological Sciences.

  • 5 hours of introductory biology (BIO_SC 1500 or BIO_SC 1200)
  • 10 hours of additional courses at the 2000-level or above from at least two of the following areas: Genetics, Cell Biology, Evolutionary Biology, and Biological Diversity (contact the  Undergraduate Advising Office for a list of available courses).

At least one of the additional courses must include a laboratory. Problems, service learning, internships, readings and research (e.g., BIO_SC 2010, 2060, 2100, 2940, 2960/2965H, 4085, 4950/4952, 4960) may not be used to fulfill the requirements of the minor.  MICROB_3200 may not be used to satisfy the laboratory course requirement.

All courses in the minor must have a grade of C- or higher with a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher in the minor. At least 9 of the 15 credit hours in the minor must be taken in residence at MU.

Application Process

  1. Print and complete the appropriate form.
  2. Submit the completed form for approval to the Division of Biological Sciences Undergraduate Advising Office.
  3. Submit the signed form to the College of Arts and Sciences (107 Lowry Hall).

For More Information

Contact or visit the Undergraduate Advising Office
Tucker Hall, Room 3
Phone: 573-882-4068

Chris Pierret, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic

Professor Chris Pierret holding a large catfish and laughing.

“The most meaningful thing that the Division of Biological Sciences and MU Graduate School did for me was to free me to grow into the shoes of an academic. I was given the space and support to work within multiple departments to explore all aspects of my science. By working with mentors in science, education, diversity, and religion, I was able to build the core that supports my current work.”

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Birthplace of the phage display technology

Invented by Dr. George Smith in 1985, phage-display technology is a method for the study of protein-protein, protein-peptide, and protein-DNA interactions that uses bacteriophages to connect proteins with the genetic information that encodes them. The method is now widely used in the medical biotechnology field, especially in the area of antibody/antigen interactions and drug discovery.

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