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Transfer Students

The Division of Biological Sciences welcomes transfer students. We offer a one-credit hour Transfer Interest Group (TRIG) class for transfer students to help them meet fellow biology majors and to learn about campus involvement, undergraduate research opportunities, and other campus resources.

Students from Metropolitan Community College in Kansas City, Moberly Area Community College, and Saint Louis Community College can earn a specially designed Associate of Arts (at MACC or SLCC) or Associate of Science (at MCC) degree with an emphasis in biology from that institution and then transfer to MU to complete either a Bachelor of Arts (BA) or a Bachelor of Science (BS) in Biological Sciences with 63 or fewer additional hours of coursework at MU. Mizzou has developed specific articulation agreements and transfer guides.

MU’s Office of Admissions offers transfer course equivalency information for students from other institutions in Missouri. Students from out-of-state schools must have courses evaluated on an individual basis by the MU Office of Admissions.

The Office of Student Financial Aid has information on scholarships available for transfer students.

For More Information

Carol Martin, Coordinator Student Services
Tucker Hall, Room 3
Phone: 573-882-4068

Katie Becklin, Ph.D.

AAUW Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas

Katie Becklin

“The biology department has been an incredible source of support for me as a scientist. During graduate school, I worked closely with a number of excellent faculty mentors who encouraged me to tackle difficult research questions and come up with innovative approaches. These people were instrumental in helping me become an independent scientist.”

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First artificial chromosomes in plants

Developed by Dr. James Birchler, these engineered mini-chromosomes can be designed to specification, with the potential of genes or entire biochemical pathways added or removed as needed. In addition to shedding light on the behavior of chromosomes, artificial chromosomes also have potential applications in agriculture, biotechnology, and the pharmaceutical industry.

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