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Courses for non-Majors

The Division of Biological Sciences offers several introductory courses that fulfill required biological, physical, and mathematical sciences general education requirements. These courses do not apply toward a major in biological sciences.

General Principles and Concepts of Biology (BIO_SC 1010): This course emphasizes connections and applications of science to society and the human condition, science literacy, and critical thinking skills. General principles and fundamental concepts of living things are also covered. (Prerequisite: MATH 1100/1120 or concurrent enrollment)

General Biology Laboratory (BIO_SC 1020): This laboratory course uses exercises dealing with representative organisms and methods of modern biological sciences. (Prerequisite: BIO_SC 1010 or 1400 or 1010 concurrently)

Basic Environmental Studies (BIO_SC 1060): This course covers ecosystems, energy and biogeochemical cycles, and population dynamics; relation of the environment to agriculture and technology, pollution, power and food production; politico-economic considerations; and moral and ethical issues.

General Botany with Laboratory (BIO_SC 1200): This course provides an introduction to the study of plants with emphasis placed on structure, growth, physiology, genetics, and reproduction.

Evolution for Everyone (BIO_SC 1400): This course explores the application of evolutionary theory to modern human affairs. Students learn about the processes involved in evolution and investigate evolutionary interpretations of human social behavior (e.g., psychology, mate choice, economics, religion, and morality).

Community Biology (BIO_SC 2060): This course is an integrated set of lectures on evolution/population genetics, population dynamics/social systems and ecosystem structure/process, biomass in worldwide context, and humans in the environment. (Prerequisites: BIO_SC 1100, 1200 or 1500 or equivalent)

Infectious Diseases (BIO_SC 2100): This course covers the basic science of bacterial, viral, protozoan, fungal, and helminth infections. It also discusses how illness has influenced or been affected by public policy and culture. (Prerequisite: BIO_SCI 1010)

For More Information

Contact or visit the Undergraduate Advising Office
Tucker Hall, Room 3
Phone: 573-882-4068