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Pride Points

Celebrated Alumni

Mizzou Biology Alumnus Dr. Martin Sanders (BA ’75) is recipient of the 2014 Distinguished Alumni Award from MU’s College of Arts and Science.

Celebrated Alumni

Mizzou Biology alumnus Dr. Edward Buckler (Ph.D. ’97) was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 2014.

Above average graduation rate for Ph.D. students

The graduation rate for Ph.D. students in the Division of Biological Sciences is 85%, well above the 62.9% for other comparable schools in the life sciences.

Above average in time to complete a doctorate degree

Median years required to complete a doctorate in the Division of Biological Sciences is 5.4 years, well below the national average of 6.9 years in the life sciences (March 2010; Council of Graduate Schools).

Among the most prestigious academic honor society

In 2015, 16 seniors and 4 juniors from the Division of Biological Sciences were invited to join Phi Beta Kappa, the oldest and most prestigious academic honor society in the United States.

Former home of Barbara McClintock

Dr. Barbara McClintock, recipient of the 1983 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine, was a faculty member in the Department of Botany (now Division of Biological Sciences) from 1936 to 1941.

Among the University of Missouri System’s most prestigious professors

Five professors in the Division of Biological Sciences have been appointed Curators’ Professors by the Board of Curators, one of the highest honors accorded by the University System.

Among the best teachers at MU

The teaching excellence of ten professors in the Division of Biological Sciences have been recognized with receipt of the William T. Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence, the most prestigious teaching award bestowed by the University of Missouri.

Birthplace of the phage display technology

Invented by Dr. George Smith in 1985, phage-display technology is a method for the study of protein-protein, protein-peptide, and protein-DNA interactions that uses bacteriophages to connect proteins with the genetic information that encodes them. The method is now widely used in the medical biotechnology field, especially in the area of antibody/antigen interactions and drug discovery.

First artificial chromosomes in plants

Developed by Dr. James Birchler, these engineered mini-chromosomes can be designed to specification, with the potential of genes or entire biochemical pathways added or removed as needed. In addition to shedding light on the behavior of chromosomes, artificial chromosomes also have potential applications in agriculture, biotechnology, and the pharmaceutical industry.

Among the nation’s most prestigious scientists

Ten Division of Biological Sciences professors are elected Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. This prestigious national honor is bestowed for meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications.

Among the nation’s most prestigious scientists

James Birchler, a Curators’ Professor of biological sciences, is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors accorded a U.S. scientist or engineer.

No. 1 undergraduate major

The Division of Biological Sciences is the No. 1 major undergraduates choose to pursue in the College of Arts and Science.